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Caribbean - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Digital Media - Statistics and Analyses


Report Details

Caribbean - Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Digital Media - Statistics and Analyses

SKU BUDDMAY16104
Category Mobile and Wireless Telecommunication
Publisher Budde Comm
Pages 90
Published May-16
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Description

Executive summary
Normalisation of relations with the US lifts restrictions in telecom equipment importsCuba still has the lowest mobile phone and internet penetration rates in the region, and is also among the lowest for fixed-line teledensity. Fixed-line and mobile services remain a monopoly of the government-controlled Empresa de Telecomunicaciones de Cuba (ETESCA Cubacel).
Although there remain substantial state controls over the right to own and use certain communications services, including the right to access the internet, a thawing of relations between the US and Cuba has encouraged the government to improve access to services. During 2015 a number of free Wi-Fi hotspots were introduce, albeit with slow connectivity, and while the cost of internet access was more than halved in mid-year, to $2 per hour, it is still prohibitively expensive for most Cubans. Access to sites is also tightly controlled and censored. The ongoing normalisation of relations with the US promises to have considerable economic benefits for Cuba. This is particularly important given the dire economic difficulties of the country’s chief sponsor, Venezuela. During 2015 the main US mobile network operators, including AT&T, Sprint, Verizon and T-Mobile US, signed internet and roaming agreements with the Cuban incumbent telco ETESCA, while in January 2016 the FCC allowed US firms to do business directly with the Cuban telecom sector. In addition, the government has looked favourably on proposals for a new subsea cable to link Cuba directly with Florida, which would supplement the only direct international cable access, via the ALBA-1 cable from Venezuela.
Market penetration rates in Cuba’s telecoms sector – 2015 (e)
Penetration of telecoms services:Penetration
Fixed-line telephony11.5%
Internet users30.0%
Mobile SIM (population)16.4%
(Source: BuddeComm based on various sources)
Key developments:

Thaw in relations with the US promising stimulus to Cuba’s economic prospects;
FCC removes Cuba from its ‘exclusion list’, enabling US companies to
Cuba expresses interest in new subsea cable to Florida;
Netflix launched services in Cuba in February 2015 following the lifting of trade restrictions from US companies, though the high price guarantees limited take-up.
T-Mobile joins Verizon and Sprint in offering roaming and cheap calls to Cuba;
DTTV reached about five million people by late 2014, with coverage extended to all provincial capital cities.
In mid-2014 the government allowed internet services to be extended to non-agricultural cooperatives, though these must comply with the same strict conditions which apply to other authorized outlets.
The ALBA-1 submarine fibre-optic cable between Cuba and Venezuela has the potential to provide 640Gb/s bandwidth. In May 2013 the Jamaican branch of the cable was opened for traffic, following the route through to Venezuela in January 2013.
In March 2014 ETECSA introduced a new mobile email service, @nauta.cu. The operator also planned to extend ADSL-based services to residential homes. In preparation, the Ministry of Communications set the maximum tariff which ETECSA can charge per megabyte at CUC1.
ETECSA in February 2015 allowed Cubans to have up to three mobile lines, lifting the restriction of a single line per subscriber imposed in March 2008.


News/Press Release

Table of Content

1. Regional Overview
1.1 Telecommunications market
1.1.1 Overview
1.2 Regulatory environment
1.2.1 Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)
1.2.2 Eastern Caribbean Telecommunications Authority (ECTEL)
1.2.3 Telecom sector liberalisation
1.2.4 Caribbean Association of National Telecommunication Organisations (CANTO)
1.3 Major telecom operators in the Caribbean
1.3.1 Flow (Cable & Wireless/Liberty Global)
1.3.2 Digicel
1.4 Company timeline
1.5 Review of Digicel’s markets
1.6 Digicel’s financial performance
1.7 Telecommunications infrastructure
1.7.1 Submarine cable systems
1.8 Broadband market
1.8.1 Overview
1.9 Mobile communications
1.9.1 Overview
1.9.2 Mobile statistics
1.9.3 Satellite mobile
2. Anguilla
3. Antigua and Barbuda
3.1 Mobile market
4. Aruba
5. Bahamas
5.1 Mobile
5.1.1 Second and third mobile licenses
5.2 Internet
5.3 Submarine cables
6. Barbados
6.1 Market background
6.2 Mobile
6.3 Internet
7. Bermuda
7.1 Market background
7.2 Mobile
7.3 Internet
7.4 Smart grids
8. British Virgin Islands
8.1 Mobile services
9. Cayman Islands
9.1 Mobile networks:
10. Dominica
11. Grenada
12. Guadeloupe
13. Martinique
14. Montserrat
15. (The former) Netherlands Antilles
16. St Kitts and Nevis
17. St Lucia
17.1 Mobile
18. St Vincent and the Grenadines
19. Trinidad and Tobago
19.1 Fixed-line
19.2 Mobile
20. Turks and Caicos
21. United States Virgin Islands

List of Figures

Table 1 –Caribbean GDP – 2003 - 2016
Table 2 – CWC financial data (Caribbean) – 2010 - 2015
Table 3 – CWC revenue by sector (Caribbean) – 2010 - 2015
Table 4 – CWC subscribers by sector (Caribbean/BTC) – 2009 - 2015
Table 5 – Digicel financial statistics – 2010 - 2015
Table 6 – Digicel revenue by operating segment – 2013 - 2015
Table 7 – Digicel revenue by geographic sector ($ million) – 2014 - 2015
Table 8 – Active mobile broadband subscribers in select Caribbean countries – 2014
Table 9 – Fixed-line broadband subscribers in select Caribbean countries – 2015 (e)
Table 10 – Mobile subscribers in select Caribbean countries – 2015 (e)
Table 11 – Country data Anguilla – 2015 (e)
Table 12 – Anguilla communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 13 – Country data Antigua and Barbuda – 2015 (e)
Table 14 – Antigua and Barbuda fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2005 - 2016
Table 15 – Antigua and Barbuda fixed-telephony lines in service – 2005 - 2016
Table 16 – Antigua and Barbuda mobile subscribers and penetration – 2001 - 2016
Table 17 – Country data Aruba – 2015 (e)
Table 18 – Aruba fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2003 - 2016
Table 19 – Aruba mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 - 2016
Table 20 – Country data Bahamas – 2015 (e)
Table 21 – Bahamas fixed lines in services and penetration – 2000 - 2016
Table 22 – Bahamas mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 - 2016
Table 23 – Bahamas fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2001 - 2016
Table 24 – Country data Barbados – 2015 (e)
Table 25 – Bermuda mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 - 2016
Table 26 – Barbados fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2007 - 2016
Table 27 – Country data Bermuda – 2015 (e)
Table 28 – KeyTech Group financial data – 2010 - 2016
Table 29 – Bermuda mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 - 2016
Table 30 – Bermuda fixed-line broadband subscribers – 2005 - 2016
Table 31 – Bermuda fixed lines in services – 2003 - 2016
Table 32 – Country data British Virgin Islands – 2015 (e)
Table 33 – Country data Cayman Islands – 2015 (e)
Table 34 – Cayman Island subscribers by service – 2005 - 2015
Table 35 – Cayman Island penetration by service – 2005 - 2015
Table 36 – Cayman Island telecom and broadcasting revenue – 2008 - 2015
Table 37 – Country data Dominica – 2015 (e)
Table 38 – Dominica communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2015
Table 39 – Dominica fixed broadband subscribers – 2003 - 2016
Table 40 – Dominica fixed lines in service – 2000 - 2016
Table 41 – Dominica mobile subscribers – 2000 - 2016
Table 42 – Country data Grenada – 2015 (e)
Table 43 – Grenada communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 44 – Grenada fixed broadband subscribers – 2005 - 2016
Table 45 – Grenada fixed lines in service – 2000 - 2016
Table 46 – Grenada mobile subscribers – 2000 - 2016
Table 47 – Country data Guadeloupe – 2015 (e)
Table 48 – Country data Martinique – 2015 (e)
Table 49 – Country data Montserrat – 2015 (e)
Table 50 – Montserrat communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 51 – Country data Netherlands Antilles – 2015 (e)
Table 52 – Netherlands Antilles fixed lines in service – 2002 - 2016
Table 53 – Country data St Kitts and Nevis – 2015 (e)
Table 54 – St Kitts and Nevis communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 55 – St Kitts and Nevis fixed broadband subscribers – 2002 - 2016
Table 56 – St Kitts and Nevis mobile subscribers – 2000 - 2016
Table 57 – St Kitts and Nevis fixed-lines in service – 2000 - 2016
Table 58 – Country data St Lucia – 2015 (e)
Table 59 – St Lucia communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 60 – St Lucia fixed broadband subscribers – 2003 - 2016
Table 61 – St Lucia mobile subscribers – 2000 - 2016
Table 62 – Country data St Vincent and the Grenadines – 2015 (e)
Table 63 – St Vincent and the Grenadines communications sector revenue – 2008 - 2016
Table 64 – St Vincent and the Grenadines fixed broadband subscribers – 2003 - 2016
Table 65 – St Vincent and the Grenadines mobile subscribers – 2000 - 2016
Table 66 – Country data Trinidad and Tobago – 2015 (e)
Table 67 – Trinidad and Tobago telecom revenue by service – 2013 - 2015
Table 68 – Trinidad and Tobago telecom subscribers by service – 2010 - 2015
Table 69 – Trinidad and Tobago ARPU by service (TT$) – 2013 - 2015
Table 70 – Trinidad and Tobago mobile internet penetration – 2013 - 2015
Table 71 – Country data Turks and Caicos – 2015 (e)
Table 72 – Country data United States Virgin Islands – 2015 (e)
Chart 1 – CWC financial data (Caribbean) – 2010 – 2015
Chart 2 – CWC revenue by sector – 2010 – 2015
Chart 3 – CWC subscribers by sector (Caribbean/BTC) – 2009 – 2015
Exhibit 1 – Island territories of the Caribbean
Exhibit 2 – Telecom privatisation and liberalisation in the Caribbean
Exhibit 3 – Digicel’s Caribbean operations
Exhibit 4 – Major submarine cable networks serving the Caribbean region

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